New Jersey Child Support

When individuals go through a divorce and have children, one parent is often deemed the “custodial parent,” while the other is the “noncustodial parent.” The noncustodial parent will often be required to make child support payments because in New Jersey, parents are obligated to financially support their child until they are emancipated. The age of emancipation is different depending on your child’s situation. For example, if your child joins the military at age 18, they may be considered emancipated. However, if your child is a college student, the parent’s obligation to support the child can be extended until the child turns 23 years old. Of course, everyone’s situation is different, so it is important to consult with an experienced family law attorney who can provide you with assistance.

In New Jersey, support is determined based upon the New Jersey Child Support Guidelines. These apply to parties with a combined net income between $170 and $3,600 per week. There are several factors that are also considered along with the guidelines. Some of these include:

  • The family’s standard of living before divorce;
  • The income and assets of each parent;
  • The earning capacity of the child;
  • The age and health of the child, and any special needs they may have;
  • Debts and liabilities of each child and parent;
  • The custody arrangement; and
  • The child’s need for further education.

Further, even after the divorce is finalized, the parents’ situations may change and an adjustment to the current child support award may be necessary. In these situations, a post-judgment motion can be filed to request a change to the child support award. An experienced family law attorney can assist with the filing of such a motion.

If you are facing any issues involving child support, it is important that you consult with a family law attorney who can assess your situation and guide you accordingly. Contact our firm today to discuss your matter.